WORTH.

Textile design for menswear designer David C. Wigley’s 2012’s collection, presented at Fashion Arts Toronto.

Photo | Patrick Lacsina for Chasseur Magazine

Back in 2011, I worked closely with fashion designer David C. Wigley of WORTH. By David C. Wigley. He was quickly becoming an established name in Toronto as he was about to undergo, yet again, a symbolic gestational period. The climax being the birth of a menswear collection, just in time to show at Fashion Arts Toronto (FAT) that year.

He approached me to create a textile print that would act as the common thread (no pun intended) throughout the looks walking the runway that night.

When I asked him what his inspiration was for the collection, he talked about extremes within reality. Light and dark, negative vs positive, life… death. He was constructing a mostly monochromatic collection, with the intention that the print would create the pops of colour.

Photo | Steve Alkok (2012)

Photo | Steve Alkok (2012)

I love when a client says “I trust you.” After we spoke, I thought about what I was going to do. It was around the same time I had been working with Sunny Fong on our collaboration for his womens' collection for Spring/Summer 2013. I had been spending a lot of time at Allan Gardens, taking pictures of every colour and texture I’d see. Florals were most definitely making an appearance, but what where would the death come in?

Photo | Steve Alkok (2012)

Death. Dying. Rotting. Bones. This was the thought process I had and went with it. Now I just needed some good photos. I took my Canon to the Royal Ontario Museum and started taking pictures of every skeleton I could find. Specifically the birds. They were the weirdest looking to me and I figured I could make a fun pattern with their shape, and they looked so sinister, they’d contrast nicely with the very soft, romantic textures of the petals.

Photo | Steve Alkok (2012) Wigley alongside Dylan Uscher (DylaniumKnits)

Photo | Steve Alkok (2012) Wigley alongside Dylan Uscher (DylaniumKnits)

What I loved about working with David was that he was really collaborative. Along with me, the collection included uniquely constructed knit pieces tying together the new line, made by Dylan Uscher of Dylanium Knits. David wanted to bring in different talent to combine a final product with three points of view, all mashed together. It was the perfect symbol for what I’ve strived my career to be about.

Detail of the textile pattern

Detail of the textile pattern